Saturday 25th March 2017,
Televisual

Web Video Weekly: Netflix/Facebook Deals, Vevo/MySpace Talks, Cheezburger, Starz and LAWebFest Promote Series

Important news and views in web video, TV, convergence and digital culture during the last week (3/25-4/1)! Double bullets () indicate a must-read!:

Web Video Market:

Netflix, Facebook In New Streaming Deals (Hollywood Reporter; The Wrap): Netflix might do a deal with Miramax for hundreds of films, and has expanded its deal with Fox (Glee, Sons of Anarchy). Meanwhile Facebook will stream more films from Warner Bros., which coincidentally is in talks to acquire Flixster. Ryan Lawler has some advice for Facebook, while Joshua Cohen thinks the social network isn’t a competitor yet.

Huffington Post Co-Founder Starts Web Video Studio, Bedrocket (AllThingsD)

Vimeo Releases iPhone App (ReadWriteWeb)

Vevo Make Take Over MySpace (Bloomberg): Mashable explains why it makes sense.

Web Series:

BlipTV Starts Service for To Adapt TV/Ads for Web (Adweek): Launches creative services division to help brands adapt to web.

Kiefer Sutherland’s The Confession Premieres on Hulu (Variety; New York Times): David Kaplan writes about Hulu’s push for content. Jessica Vascellaro looks at the efforts of web video companies to build loyal audiences.

Cheezburger Buys Know Your Meme (Tubefilter; NewTeeVee): Makes perfect sense to me.

Yobi.TV Expands Programming With Reality Stars (ExtraTV): The Situation, first Audrina Partridge.

LAWebFest Honors Indie Web Series (Facebook): Lots of new series honored. Nine web series are going to France to screen their shows there.

Rhett & Link Get IFC Show (ReelSEO): The kind of deal that should be happening more often. In other news, Kevin Nalty discusses the problems with viral and YouTube stardom, while Dina Kaplan discusses web vs. traditional TV.

Starz Renews, Expands How It Should Have Ended (Tubefilter; Hollywood Reporter)

Research and Policy:

Time Warner, Cablevision in Streaming iPad Fight (New York Times)

Public Knowledge Reports on Bandwidth Shortage (Public Knowledge): “Our survey indicates that the era of plentiful, low-cost bandwidth is coming to an end as data bits, the raw material of information, become in increasingly short supply.  As the report states, once those bits are used up, they aren’t coming back.”

Hollywood and Tech:

US TV Viewing Trends By Race (Nielsen): Black people watch the most.

Hollywood Studios Expanding Premium VOD (WebProNews)

W3C Reports on Open Formats for Internet TV (ReadWriteWeb; MediaPost)

 

 

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About The Author

Aymar Jean Christian is assistant professor of communication at Northwestern University. He writes about media and society for a number of publications. For more information, click the "About" tab at the top of the page.

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